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Show Up! Non-Toxic HB on the May 1 Council Agenda!

April 26, 2017

Councilman Billy O’Connell put a Non-Toxic HB item on the May 1 City Council agenda. The vote would formally initiate a non-toxic Integrated Pest Management pilot program at Central Park West.

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Irvine was 1st. Last week San Juan Capistrano became 2nd.

Urge our Council to make Huntington Beach the next Non-Toxic city!

Save the date:

May 1st at 6pm in Council chambers
2000 Main Street, Huntington Beach

Public comments are 3 minutes long. Get there early to fill out a comment card. If you need help with talking points, see the info graphic below, and visit www.hbtomorrow.org for resources and information.

Also visit the Non-Toxic HB Facebook page.

If you can’t make it, write in a comment via Surf City Pipeline. Here’s some text you can copy-and-paste or edit to get you started:

I am writing in SUPPORT of Councilmember O’Connell’s item no. 9 on the May 1st Council agenda, to formally initiate a non-toxic Integrated Pest Management program in Huntington Beach.

_____________

UPDATE: Agenda now available online here. We are the last item on the calendar:

9. Submitted by Councilmember O’Connell – Consider a Pilot Program utilizing organic pesticides in Central Park West
Recommended Action:
Direct Public Works to perform an organic pesticide pilot project in Central Park West for a one year duration.  Provide updates to the City Council in six months and one year, with recommendations for updating the Integrated Pest management Program utilizing the results of the pilot project.

Suggested questions/comments:

  • “The OC Register just reported that San Juan Capistrano unanimously approved a city-wide program. This follows Irvine also unanimously approving its own city-wide program a year ago, including schools, and covering substantially more acreage. Costa Mesa and HB school districts have already halted spraying. No major problems have occurred.
    “It is time we boldly go where others have already gone before.”
  • “Local parent have reported children being diagnosed with brain cancers in the past few years. Some of the mothers while they were pregnant lived in a condo community where glyphosate was routinely applied on paved areas immediately next to doorsteps, windows and AC units, during their pregnancies. One little boy’s 6-month treatment at CHOC cost his parents $120,000. These costs are real even if they don’t accrue directly to the landscaping company.
    “We cannot talk about landscaping costs of weed-management until we are prepared to talk about the medical costs of spraying public spaces with listed probable carcinogens.”

Some Background Information:

QUESTION:   What chemicals does the City currently use?

ANSWER:      Currently, Huntington Beach uses a number of toxic chemicals in our parks and public areas where children, adults, and pets are exposed. These include:

  • herbicides (e.g., Roundup Promax, Glyphsate 4 Plus, Oryzalin 4 Pro, etc.);
  • insecticides (e.g., Criterior 75, Safari 20, etc.);
  • rodenticides (e.g., Kaput D, Talpirid); and
  • mulluscicides (Deadline T&O).

These chemicals are blown by winds and tracked into homes where they can be trapped in carpets for years.

 

QUESTION:   What are the risks of using chemical pesticides, herbicides, and rodenticides?

ANSWER:      When pesticides are used together simultaneously, they can interact with each other in unpredictable ways, changing or amplifying their effects. This is commonly known as the “grapefruit-juice effect”: doctors often counsel patients not to drink grapefruit juice with certain medication because it may change how the body reacts to them. Pesticides work the same way, but very little research has been done in this area, so the interactions are largely untested, and thus unknown.

What is known about pesticides is that they are inherently unsafe:

  • The EPA and the National Academy of Sciences concur that children take in more pesticides relative to body weight than adults.
  • A study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute finds that household and garden pesticide use can increase the risk of childhood leukemia as much as seven-fold. Lowengart, R., et al. 1987, Childhood Leukemia and Parent’s Occupational and Home Exposures, Journal of the National Cancer Institute 79:39.
  • Out of all 99 human studies done on lymphoma and pesticides, 75 find a link between the two. Osburn, S. 2001, Do Pesticides Cause Lymphoma? Lymphoma Foundation of America, Chevy Chase, MD.
  • The American Cancer Society published a study finding people exposed to the popular weedkiller Roundup were 2.7 times more likely to develop non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Hardell, L., et al. 1999 Mar., A Case-Control Study of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma and Exposure to Pesticides, of the Am. Cancer Soc. (85):6. p.1353.
  • Exposure to pesticides in our parks and public areas can lead to chronic toxicity and harm to children, adults, and pets.
  • While pesticides must be registered with and approved by the EPA, this is not a guarantee of safety, or that thorough testing has been done. Assuming otherwise once caused Americans to incorrectly assume lead paint, asbestos, and cigarettes were proven safe. For example, of the 36 most commonly used lawncare pesticides registered before 1984, only one has been fully tested. Of these products, 14 are probable or possible carcinogens, 15 are linked to birth defects, 21 with reproductive effects, 24 with neurotoxicity, 22 with liver or kidney damage, and 34 are sensitizers or irritants. The American Academy of Pediatrics says there is no safe level of pesticide exposure for children.
  • Concerns over Roundup’s active chemical, glyphosate, continue to abound. g., Concerns Over Use of Glyphosate-Based Herbicides and Risks Associated with Exposures: A Consensus Statement, at http://nebula.wsimg.com/5dbc5686146bf7701d1f97b53ba7c40b?AccessKeyId=F8EFA7E56875355794EB&disposition=0&alloworigin=1; Trends in Glyphosate Herbicide Use in the United States and Globally, at http://nebula.wsimg.com/7cd7b4d04249e066a50527453da41a6b?AccessKeyId=F8EFA7E56875355794EB&disposition=0&alloworigin=1.

 

QUESTION:   What are the costs?

ANSWER:      Organic turf management is less expensive in the long-run and uses 30% less water.

Studies have shown costs to be lower with organics over a 5-year term, and that’s before factoring in the health and medical costs the chemical products impose on our residents and children. Conventional chemicals only appear cheaper because they do not account for their externalities, ultimately paid for by our residents.

Many communities continue to see their children diagnosed with brain cancers, birth defects, autism, asthma, and learning disabilities, and adults diagnosed with reproductive dysfunction, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, and several types of cancers. While we do not know all the causes and how they contribute, it is important to reduce the prevalence of harsh and harmful chemicals in and around our homes and where our children play.

Organic landscaping builds the bio-diversity of the soil, making desired plants healthier and better able to resist incursion by weeds. It also makes the soil spongier and better able to absorb water. See http://www.grassrootsinfo.org/pdf/turfcomparisonreport.pdf.

Depending on the results of the City’s pilot program, City Staff may be asked to determine the amount of the modest up-front costs.

 

QUESTION:   Is it effective?

ANSWER:      Yes. Harvard University has successfully used organic landscaping on its ​landscapes and hardscapes since 2008. See http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/24/garden/24garden.html?_r=1 and http://www.energyandfacilities.harvard.edu/facilities-services/landscape-maintenance.

In Irvine, the Quail Hill’s master HOA has successfully used organic ​landscaping practices since April 2015. They stopped using toxic pesticides, switched to a vinegar solution for weeds and are using soil testing, compost top-dressing, appropriate turf height maintenance and other organic cultural practices to maintain the parks, greenbelts and other landscaping features. The change has been successful, with no homeowner complaints and no increase in costs. For questions about Quail Hill’s organic landscaping program, contact Linda Reyes with Villa Park Landscaping at linda@vplinc.com.

 

QUESTION:   Where else has this proposal been tried?

ANSWER:      On the unanimous vote of its City Council, Irvine switched to an organic landscaping policy in February 2016. Since then, Irvine has managed its more than 570 acres of parks, 800 acres of right-of-way, 70,000 trees and nearly 1.5 million square feet of facilities without conventional pesticides, including glyphosate, the active ingredient in the popular Roundup product. The transition to organic landscape management starts with soil testing and involves practices such as heavy mulching, overseeding turf, appropriate turf height maintenance, and use of compost teas. There have been no known complaints to the program.

San Clemente City Council in April 2017 approved a non-toxic proposal.

HB Unified School District in early 2017 stayed the use of chemicals to roll out an organic program.

Costa Mesa School District has done the same.

 

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Here are some articles on the web to give you more background information on the issue:

HB Tomorrow’s April 2017 Newsletter

April 10, 2017

Below is HB Tomorrow’s April Newsletter. Become a member and have these newsletters delivered to your inbox! You can also sign up for free here.

You can read our past newsletters here.


HB Tomorrow Newsletter
April 2017

Edited by Tim Kowal

Dear HB Tomorrow Members and Neighbors,

Here are some stories from around our community the past month:

Annual Meeting and Town Hall Recap:
About 80 people packed the Talbert Room at the Central Library the evening of March 30 and directed thoughtful questions to Mayor Barbara Delgleize, HBPD Captain Russ Reinhart, and Deputy City Manager Ken Domer. Councilmembers Lyn Semeta, Patrick Brendan, and Billy O’Connell, and many city staff were also present. Thank you to all those in our city’s leadership and our communities for showing up!

Many of you signed up to receive this newsletter and other HB Tomorrow announcements. Thank you!

If you are not already a member, please consider joining!

Some of the issues raised at the forum:

  • Many residents are seeing rats from the Pacific City construction. Leadership suggested contacting Code Enforcement and otherwise taking reasonable pest-control precautions.
  • Sober living facilities. These continue to vex leadership as there is little that cities can do in light of state law that preempts the field. Lyn Semeta pointed out there is a bill proposed in Sacramento that would create a pilot project to bring state personnel to help enforce against unlicensed facilities operating with more than six residents.
  • Short term vacation rentals. These continue to cause a nuisance for some residents. The city prohibits renting for less than a 30-day term except in Sunset Beach. More bills are being suggested that could add more tools.
  • Internet carrier competition. The city is buying SCE’s light posts and, after replacing with LEDs, will save millions of dollars. The additional upshot is the city might attach wifi to the tops of the lampposts.
  • Lots of questions about the homeless. Billy O’Connell has a big heart for this issue and we are looking forward to his suggestions for our city.
  • Beach playground funding. Some entrepreneurial community members are working hard to make this a reality.
  • High-density housing. There remain strong feelings that the high-density projects at Bella Terra, the Beach-Edinger corridor, and elsewhere in the city were ill-conceived, and that we are now paying the price.
  • Some residents are concerned that road repairs around Heil, Edinger, Springdale, and Edwards lag behind, while newer developments get improvements.
  • Many of us continue to look for funding to open the library on Sunday.

If there are other issues you believe HB Tomorrow should raise, please let us know.

Non-Toxic Pilot Program on the Way!
We have some movement on the Non-Toxic HB front. At HB Tomorrow’s annual meeting on March 30, Mayor Barbara Delgleize announced our city is putting a pilot program in place. The city is compiling information about which organic turf-management products and methods have worked in Irvine. We will bring updates about the progress and results of the pilot program as information becomes available.

If the pilot program goes well, we will urge the Council to bring it to a vote.

Additionally, the Huntington Beach City School District Superintendent recently suspended the use of toxic pesticides pending further review.

More information coming soon. Sign up at our website, and follow HB Tomorrow on Facebook. Also follow the Non-Toxic Huntington Beach page on Facebook.

The Council still needs to see and hear your support. Please follow Non-Toxic Huntington Beach and let us know when you can appear at a Council meeting to keep up the support for this initiative! Please contact us and info@hbtomorrow.org if you are willing to write or speak to the City Council in the coming months to show you want our parks to be non-toxic.

Roundup’s Active Ingredient to Remain on California Cancer List, Judge Says:
A superior court recently tossed Roundup-maker Monsanto’s challenge to delist its active component, glyphosate, from the Prop 65 probable-carcinogen list. Please see our website for more information about HBT’s effort to make our parks and public spaces non-toxic.

HBT Urges OCWD: “Vote No on Poseidon”:
HB Tomorrow recently sent a letter to Orange County Water District president Denis Bilodeau, urging him to oppose building the Poseidon Desalination Plant in our city given the lack of need for this expensive new source of water. A copy of the letter is available at our website.

In other desal news: BBC News reports that Graphene-based sieve can now turn seawater into drinking water. This promising technology continues to progress.

In 10 years, the hope is we will have high-efficiency graphene filters to easily take the salt out of water (CleanTechnica.com), and we will can build tiny, inexpensive fusion reactors (ExtremeTech.com), which will give us plenty of energy to take water through the natural filtration of the sand, thereby avoiding the threats to aquatic life presented by current desal options.

Proposed Bill Would Allow Cities to Impose Rent Control:
AB 1506 proposed to lower rental prices by overturning the 1995 law Costa-Hawkins Rental Housing Act, which banned residential rent control on buildings constructed after 1999.

The groups Tenants Together and Golden State Manufactured-Home-Owners League, Inc. are in favor of AB 1506 and allow cities to try approaches to make communities more affordable.

Addressing Community Decay, One Neighborhood at a Time:
One very thoughtful question at our Annual Meeting deserves more attention. A neighborhood in the path of the major 405 construction project will see the welcome removal of a footbridge that brings drugs and illicit activity across the highway into a quiet residential area. Unfortunately, CalTrans is set to replace the nuisance by the end of construction.

Is this just an OCTA/CalTrans problem? Should the concerns of this community be handed off to remote bureaucrats, even if they are more directly responsible for the specific task at hand.

We often hear from leadership, understandably, that concerns about drug-addicted and street-dwelling homeless causing nuisance and worse in their neighborhoods is too big for the city to do anything about. Well, here is a community with a discrete problem and a specific solution. It deserves better than: “That’s OCTA’s problem.”

Leadership should be falling over itself to tackle and take credit for solving drug and nuisance problems for parts of the community where it can do something about it — to put a mark in the “win” column when it otherwise has to repeatedly concede defeat.

Housing the Homeless: Some Figures:
A recent UCI study puts the price tag of OC homelessness at about $300 million. (OC Register)

A 2013 ACLU study estimated it would cost $55 million a year to house the homeless. (OC Register)

The numbers might be less daunting if we stop considering “the homeless” as less a monolithic group. Disabled veterans are not the same as able-bodied jobless youngsters; neither are the same as the mentally ill; and mothers desperate to provide for their young innocent children are in a special class and ought never escape our vigilant concern and compassion. As has been reported, some estimate that 80% of “the homeless” are not especially interested in getting off the streets. If that is true, then it would cost only about $11 million a year county-wide to house those homeless who don’t want to be.

There might be more good we can do by starting small.

Rocket Lab moves headquarters from Los Angeles to Huntington Beach:
The 150-200-employee small-satellite launch company has moved to a new 150,000-sq-ft facility in our city and plans to produce seven rockets this year, the LA Times reports. The company is already ramping up hiring.

Remembering Clem
Our meeting last month saw one fewer long-time community supporter after the passing of Clem Dominguez last month. We will miss him.

The OC Register wrote up a nice piece on our surfing commissioner:
Clem Dominguez, former Huntington Beach commissioner, was passionate about his city and surfing

Huntington Beach Concert Band sponsors its annual Summer Series!
Celebrating their 44th anniversary this year, the Huntington Beach Concert Band will once again sponsor its Summer Series of 11 free Sunday concerts, June 25th to September 3rd in Huntington Beach Central Park.

“The concerts are organized and sponsored by the Huntington Beach Concert Band as a community service,” said Tom Ridley, who has conducted the band for 40 years.

The Huntington Beach Concert Band Summer Series will take place in the natural amphitheater area in the park behind Huntington Beach Central Library, 7111 Talbert Ave. at Goldenwest Street. Concerts start at 5 p.m. All are invited to bring picnic dinners and beach chairs or blankets to enjoy the concerts.

Contact Linda D. Couey for more information at (714) 891-6856.
For additional info www.hbconcertband.org – or 714-891-6856
Facebook: Huntington Beach Concert Band – Please “Like” us!

California High Court Sends Banning Ranch Back to the Drawing Board
In a unanimous recent decision in Banning Ranch Conservancy v. City of Newport Beach, the Supreme Court today holds that an environment impact report “must identify areas that might qualify as environmentally sensitive habitat areas (ESHA) under the California Coastal Act of 1976 (Coastal Act; § 30000 et seq.), and account for those areas in its analysis of project alternatives and mitigation measures.”  Because the EIR in the case before it didn’t do that and because the failure was prejudicial, the court’s unanimous opinion by Justice Carol Corrigan puts a hold on commercial and residential development of a 400-acre coastal zone tract in Orange County.  The court concludes that “[i]nformation highly relevant to the Coastal Commission’s permitting function was suppressed.”

 


If you are interested in joining the Board of Directors of HB Tomorrow, please email info@hbtomorrow.org.

If you have any tips, or if there are any issues affecting Huntington Beach you would like to see addressed, please send us an email at info@hbtomorrow.org.

Please take a moment to renew your membership here.

Have a friend or neighbor who might be interested in getting more involved in our city? Please invite them to sign up here!

HBT Urges OCWD: “Vote No on Poseidon”

April 5, 2017

HB Tomorrow recently sent the following letter to Orange County Water District president Denis Bilodeau, urging him to oppose building the Poseidon Desalination Plant in our city given the lack of need for this expensive new source of water. A copy of the letter is below. [2017-03-31 OCWD – No On Poseidon.]

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Huntington Beach ratepayers are encouraged to contact the Orange County Water District and urge president Denis Bilodeau to vote no on mandating that HB pay for expensive Poseidon water.

Update: Non-Toxic Pilot Program on the Way!

April 5, 2017

We have some movement on the Non-Toxic HB front. At HB Tomorrow’s annual meeting on March 30, Mayor Barbara Delgleize announced our city is putting a pilot program in place.  The city is compiling information about which organic turf-management products and methods have worked in Irvine. We will bring updates about the progress and results of the pilot program as information becomes available.

If the pilot program goes well, we will urge the Council to bring it to a vote.

More information coming soon. Sign up using the form on the right, and follow HB Tomorrow on Facebook.

Additionally, the Huntington Beach City School District Superintendent recently suspend edthe use of toxic pesticides pending further review.

The Council still needs to see and hear your support. Please follow Non-Toxic Huntington Beach and let us know when you can appear at a Council meeting to keep up the support for this initiative!

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HBT Annual Meeting Flyer

March 12, 2017

2017 Annual Meeting

Feel free to distribute and tell a friend!
[PDF version: HBT 2017 Annual Meeting Flyer]

 

HB Tomorrow’s March 2017 Newsletter

March 1, 2017

Below is HB Tomorrow’s March Newsletter. Become a member and have these newsletters delivered to your inbox!


HB Tomorrow Newsletter
March 2017

Dear HB Tomorrow Members,

First, mark your calendars:

HB Tomorrow’s Annual Membership Meeting

March 30 at 7:00 p.m.
Central Library

Free to the Public
  • Please send your questions for Mayor Delgleize, City Manager Wilson, and HBPD Captain Reinhart via email, Facebook, or website.
  • Invite your friends and neighbors to attend.
  • Renew your membership, or join HB Tomorrow; good things in store!

Now to business. Here are some updates on items affecting our city.

Non-Toxic Huntington Beach Proposal:

Non-Toxic Huntington Beach

OC Weekly, Non-Toxic Irvine

HB Tomorrow has teamed up with Non-Toxic Huntington Beach in their shared goal to transition from toxic pest control to safer and more water-conscious and cost-saving organic measures. HBT and NTHB recently participated in a meeting at City Hall. We look forward to continuing to work with City leadership and with Irvine public works, where this program has already been successfully implemented, to advance this important issue.

BUT WE NEED YOUR SUPPORT! Councilmembers depend on a show of enthusiasm, even for win-win initiatives such as this. Please contact us and info@hbtomorrow.org if you are willing to write or speak to the City Council in the coming months to show you want our parks to be non-toxic.

Legal troubles continue for the popular pesticide Roundup, used in our parks and common areas. A recent lawsuit charges that Roundup caused non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) after EPA colluded with the chemical-maker, Monsanto. EPA issued a determination that glyphosate, Roundup’s active ingredient, as “not likely to be carcinogenic to humans.” But this is contrary to several reputable studies. For example:
  • An American Cancer Society study found people exposed to Roundup are 2.7 times more likely to develop NHL (Hardell, L., et al. 1999 Mar. “A Case-Control Study of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma and Exposure to Pesticides,” J of the Am Cancer Soc, (85):6. p.1353).
  • A 2015 WHO study found Roundup is “probably carcinogenic to humans.”
  • A 2002 study found that children born to parents exposed to glyphosate (Roundup) show a higher incidence of attention deficit disorder and hyperactivity. (Cox C. 2004. Journal Of Pesticide Reform Vol. 24 (4), citing Garry, V.F. et al. 2002. “Birth defects, season of conception, and sex of children born to pesticide applicators living in the Red River Valley of Minnesota.” Environmental Health Perspectives 110 (Suppl. 3):441-449.)
HBT continues to urge the City Council to follow the lead of the City of Irvine and the Costa Mesa school district to eliminate Roundup and other likely carcinogens from our public spaces.

Mobile Home Affordable-Housing Proposal:

Our Golden State Manufactured-home Owners League (GSMOL) Legislative Advocate Team is making recommendations tomorrow on proposed bills affecting mobilehome through the state. Currently, we are supporting four bills, five are in review, and one we oppose.

We have also discussed many of the Bills now being proposed on Affordable Housing, other than mobilehome parks.

HB Tomorrow is watching this issue.

Magnolia Tank Farm:
The first Community Meeting of the Magnolia Tank Farm Outreach Team was held on January 24th.  They will be hosting another meeting later this Spring. Based on community input from the first meeting, the Team has presented the following proposed concepts.  They are looking for neighbors to join a neighborhood advisory committee. If you are interested you may email them at info@magnoliatankfarm.com.

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Magnolia Tank Farm Site

Housing:

  • All For Sale Residential – No apartments
  • Will Not exceed 3 stories
  • 250 homes max
  • Will Not exceed Minimum 15-homes/acre

Lodge:

  • Not to exceed 4 stories
  • 175 rooms max

Open Space/Pedestrian Connectivity:

  • Squirrel Park will be retained and improved
  • Wok with the City and adjacent landowner to improve Magnolia pedestrian and  bike access
  • Create pedestrian and bicycle connections and trails

General Comments:

  • All uses will be per code
  • A neighborhood advisory committee will be formed

Traffic/Noise/Air Quality/Site Conditions:

  • Will be analyzed as part of the City EIR process

Old Rogers Senior Center Update:

The site of the former Rogers Senior Center at 17th Street between Pecan and Orange remains abandoned and unused. HB Tomorrow has learned there have been meetings with a variety of city officials and staff. Chief Handy and Community Services Director Janeen Laudenbeck are also expected to consider suggestions for interim use of the property while permanent plans are reviewed by the community services department.
HBT continues to watch this issue.

The Homeless Lawyer Up:

Orange County homeless are lawyering up, reports the OC Register. Legal Aid Society, ACLU, Public Counsel, and the Elder Law and Disability Rights Center are helping homeless file suits against local laws barring panhandling, sleeping, and camping in our public spaces. The lawsuits are a reaction to police “sweeps” of homeless encampments; the number of encampments and resulting sweeps have spiked in recent years.
One recent lawsuit halts a Santa Ana overnight-sleeping ban until more shelter beds or other housing options are made available. The city will now also provide more storage lockers for the homeless. The city may continue clearing out sites known to be drug havens.
Prohibitions against panhandling are also fraught with constitutional free-speech concerns.
An ACLU lawsuit against Laguna Beach over a ADA-noncompliant shelter and “aggressive” policing is set for trial in April.
According to the most recent county survey, Huntington Beach has the largest amount of unsheltered homeless, at 698, than any other district counted. Anaheim is second. Our city devotes two full-time police officers to homeless-related incidents, of which there were almost 800 in a 10-month period in 2015, an HBPD official said.
The most vexing problem: an incredible 80% of the homeless — a full 4 in 5! — want to stay homeless. “They want to be off the grid,” says Huntington Beach police Officer Gabe Ricci. In other words, making more low-income and extremely-low-income housing available, difficult as that is, only helps a distinct minority of the homeless population who actually want off the streets.
And while important to ensure adequate shelter is available, emphasis must be placed on making that shelter temporary, so as not to indulge the socially irresponsible choice to live on our streets.
Sources:
http://www.ocregister.com/articles/homeless-744836-people-city.html
http://www.ocregister.com/articles/homeless-702095-ricci-beach.html

CORRECTION: Beach-Warner Project:
Our February newsletter reported on the status of the Beach-Warner Project. A reader pointed out the project is no longer listed on the City’s Major Projects page. In response to HBT’s inquiry to the City, Planning Manager Jane James confirmed that the project at Beach and Warner is not listed on the pending projects list because it has been withdrawn by the applicant and the EIR was decertified by the City Council.

If you are interested in joining the Board of Directors of HB Tomorrow, please email info@hbtomorrow.org.

If you have any tips, or if there are any issues affecting Huntington Beach you would like to see addressed, please send us an email at info@hbtomorrow.org.

Please take a moment to renew your membership here.

Have a friend or neighbor who might be interested in getting more involved in our city? Please forward this email to them!

What Does HB Tomorrow Look Like?

February 16, 2017

As part of our continuing mission to promote and enhance the quality of life in our city, HB Tomorrow continues to actively promote and meet with councilmembers and staff to make Huntington Beach the next non-toxic city in Southern California, removing toxic herbicides and pesticides from our parks and other public spaces to keep our children, adults, and pets safe, save water, and protect the environment. It is a safe, effective, and cost-neutral option.

Read our letter to Mayor Delgleize and the City Council here.

Huntington Beach tomorrow should be a Non-Toxic HB.

Don’t you agree?

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